VMware vSphere 6.7 Lifecycle Management

vSphere 6.7 Lifecycle Management – A number of innovations in VMware vSphere 6.7 are focused at speeding up host lifecycle management and saving administrator’s time. vSphere Lifecycle Manager enhances the capability of preceding vSphere releases Update Manager by offering new features and settings for ESXi lifecycle management at the cluster level.

New in vSphere 6.7 Lifecycle Management

New vSphere Update Manager Interface

The new vSphere Update Manager interface in vSphere 6.7 Lifecycle Management, which is part of the vSphere Client, is included with the release of vSphere.

New vSphere Update Manager User Interface
New vSphere Update Manager User Interface

vSphere Update Manager in vSphere 6.7 keeps ESXi 6.0 to 6.7 hosts reliable and secure by making it simple for administrators to apply the latest patches and security updates. When it’s time to upgrade earlier editions to the most recent version, ESXi 6.7, vSphere Update Manager makes it simple.

Creating a New Baseline to Patch Clusters with Preferred Patches
Creating a New Baseline to Patch Clusters with Preferred Patches

The new vSphere Update Manager interface in vSphere 6.7 Lifecycle Management is more than just a rebranding of the former vSphere Web Client, which was Flash-based. The redesigned user interface makes the remediation procedure much more efficient. The prior multistep remediation wizard, for example, has been replaced by a far more efficient approach. The operation can be started with just a few clicks.

New Interface with More Streamlined Review of Remediation Actions
New Interface with More Streamlined Review of Remediation Actions

Furthermore, Pre-check is now a separate process, allowing administrators to confirm that a cluster is ready for upgrade prior to starting the procedure.

Checking Clusters to Determine Readiness for Remediation
Checking Clusters to Determine Readiness for Remediation

The new interface’s initial release supports the procedures for updating and patching ESXi hosts.

New Update Manager Interface Baselines Listing
New Update Manager Interface Baselines Listing

Many customers use vSphere Update Manager for more than just vSphere host patching and upgrades. Additional features, such as VMware Tools upgrade and hardware compatibility, will be available in a later edition.

Faster Major Version Upgrades from ESXi 6.5 to 6.7

Hosts running ESXi 6.5 will be upgraded to ESXi 6.7 much more quickly than before. We’ve made various improvements to that process, including eliminating one of the two reboots required for a host upgrade in the past. Hosts that were upgraded with vSphere Update Manager in the past were restarted first to prepare for the upgrade, then rebooted again once the upgrade was completed.

Modern server hardware, which has hundreds of gigabytes of RAM, takes several minutes to boot up and do self-tests. As a result of the cumulative effect of initializing hardware twice during an update, this feature greatly reduces maintenance periods and the overall time required to upgrade vSphere infrastructure clusters. During hypervisor upgrades, vSphere DRS and vSphere vMotion operations prevent application downtime. As needed, VMs are easily migrated from host to host.

VSphere Quick Boot

VSphere Quick Boot is a new feature in vSphere 6.7 that reduces the time it takes for an ESXi host to reboot during update activities. Host reboots aren’t common, but they’re usually required following tasks like applying a hypervisor patch or installing a third-party component or driver. Device initialization and self-tests on modern server hardware with huge RAM capacities may take several minutes.

By shutting down an ESXi host in a controlled way and then resuming it instantly, vSphere Quick Boot removes the time-consuming hardware initialization procedure. If it takes several minutes or more for the actual hardware to initialize devices and run necessary self-tests, then vSphere Quick Boot will save you about that much time. This new approach can significantly reduce the time required for data centre maintenance windows in large clusters that are traditionally remediated one host at a time.

Two Remote Consoles Comparing vSphere Quick Boot and Standard Reboot
Two Remote Consoles Comparing vSphere Quick Boot and Standard Reboot

System Requirements for using vSphere Lifecycle Manager

You must fulfil different requirements depending on whether you want to use baselines or images for software lifecycle management. To achieve your objectives, you must first understand the vSphere Lifecycle Manager’s behaviors and limits.

Scenario – Using a single image to manage a cluster.

Requirements

  • The cluster’s ESXi hosts must all be version 7.0 or later.
  • The cluster’s ESXi hosts must all be stateful.

The host boots from a drive in a stateful installation.

  • The cluster’s ESXi hosts must all be from the same vendor and have the same hardware.

Considering different generations and models of servers require distinct software drivers, you’ll need to create separate vSphere Lifecycle Manager images to handle each generation or model. VSphere Lifecycle Manager, on the other hand, uses a single image for the entire cluster. In addition, vSphere Lifecycle Manager does not identify or handle hardware variances among cluster hosts.

Only if the vSphere Lifecycle Manager image for the cluster has vendor customization, such as a vendor or firmware add-on, that can address and handle the hardware variances across the cluster’s hosts, which is a rare scenario, can you use it to manage a heterogeneous cluster.

  • The cluster must include only integrated solutions. Just for example:
    • VMware vSAN
    • VMware vSphere High Availability (HA)
    • vSphere with Tanzu
    • NSX-T Data Center

Scenario – Using baselines and baseline groups to manage a cluster.

Requirements

  • VSphere Lifecycle Manager works with ESXi 6.5, ESXi 6.7, and ESXi 7.0 to utilize baselines for ESXi host patching procedures.
  • VSphere Lifecycle Manager works with ESXi 6.5, ESXi 6.7, and their related Update versions to leverage baselines for ESXi host upgrade procedures.

Scenario – Switching from using baselines to using a single image to manage a cluster.

Requirements

  • To use an image, the cluster must meet certain requirements.
  • The cluster has to be transition-eligible.

Scenario – Upgrading virtual machine hardware and VMware Tools

RequirementsvSphere Lifecycle Manager supports ESXi 6.5, ESXi 6.7, and ESXi 7.0 for VMware Tools and virtual machine hardware upgrades.

Visit to Read moreWHAT’S NEW IN VMWARE vSPHERE 6.7

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